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I know swine flu is insulting some people, but why?
Thanks

9 comments:

Team_Edw said...

Because a lot of people thought they would get it if they ate ham or bacon, so they changed it. It is safe to eat ham!

Anonymous said...

This website will tell you the steps to stop the spread of the swine flu. Also answers question like what is the swine flu etc. Great site!http://www.swinefluusa.webs.com/

iloveyou said...

Because people stopped buying pork. They don't want to eat it because of the swine flu. Anyway i still think you shouldn't eat any pork wait till this whole thing is over. And pork is not good for you anyway....

Teddy J said...

My opinion, many people from around the world had this misconception that swine flu can be derived from swines or pigs, thus affects the exportation of pork on some parts of the world or people don't buy pork because they may get infected. Because of this negative impact on some economies, some countries decided to change the name of swine flu to H1N1.

Anonymous said...

Well im telling u this based on facts not my opinion, the swine flu is renamed because of many reasons, one this name actually hurt the pork industry, two is the H1N1 flu is a combination of Bird Flu, Swine Flu and the seasonal Human Flu. The flu actually originated from the birds but there is almost no way to get this infection to the humans but through the combination of Bird and Swine it was possible, the Swine was the link. So its unfair to say swine flu because the real culprit is the bird flu. hope this helps.

Anis said...

This virus was originally referred to as swine flu because laboratory testing showed that many of the genes in this new virus were very similar to influenza viruses that normally occur in pigs in North America. But further study has shown that this new virus is very different from what normally circulates in North American pigs. It has two genes from flu viruses that normally circulate in pigs in Europe and Asia and avian genes and human genes. Scientists call this a “quadruple reassortant” virus.

ron_8er said...

Questions & Answers
H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu) and You*
May 5, 2009 12:30 PM ET
Novel H1N1 Flu
What is H1N1 (swine flu)?
H1N1 (referred to as “swine flu” early on) is a new influenza virus causing illness in people. This new virus was first detected in people in the United States in April 2009. Other countries, including Mexico and Canada, have reported people sick with this new virus. This virus is spreading from person-to-person, probably in much the same way that regular seasonal influenza viruses spread.
H1N1 Influenza virus imageWhy is this new H1N1 virus sometimes called “swine flu”?
This virus was originally referred to as “swine flu” because laboratory testing showed that many of the genes in this new virus were very similar to influenza viruses that normally occur in pigs in North America. But further study has shown that this new virus is very different from what normally circulates in North American pigs. It has two genes from flu viruses that normally circulate in pigs in Europe and Asia and avian genes and human genes. Scientists call this a “quadruple reassortant” virus.

msnserve said...

"Deciphering the Name Change From Swine Flu To A(H1N1) Virus
Posted on 30 April 2009by unabashedlib (1)
For those of us who are not microbiologists, immunologists, virologists, epidemiologists, or any “ologists,” it’s confusing to hear the swine flu now be termed the A(H1N1) flu virus. What does this mean?
Well, the scientific nomenclature assigned to the virus is a recognition that it causes influenza in humans. According to the World Health Organization influenza viruses are grouped into three types, designated A,B, and C. Influenza A and B viruses are of concern for human health and only influenza A viruses can cause pandemics.
Components that make up the virus include subtypes. Influenza A have 16 H subtypes and 9 N subtypes. Pathogenicity (the capability to produce disease) sometimes is ascribed to the increased number in the subtype, but not always.
The H subtypes are epidemiologically more important as they govern the ability of the virus to bond and to enter cells where multiplication of the virus then occurs.
The N subtypes govern the release of newly formed virus from the cells."

JAKE OATMON said...

Influenza A virus strains are categorized according to two proteins found on the surface of the virus: hemagglutinin (H) and neuraminidase (N).
Influenza A virus strains are assigned an H number and an N number based on which forms of these two proteins the strain contains. There are 16 H and 9 N subtypes known in birds, but only H 1, 2 and 3, and N 1 and 2 are commonly found in humans
The Swine flu we have right now has H with the category of 1 and N with the category of 1. On the early epidemic of this virus, they said it has the characteristic of swine flu, and it just stuck to that. Plus rather than going with H1N1 which people might get confused, (although Swine Flu, confused a lot of people, too) and the media would rather label it as swine flu to get their story out (the media competed to try to get the news out first.). The actual swine flu that is found in pig is H3N2. H1N1 are not found in pig.

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